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Tag Archives: the Sowing Principle

Going Back to Where You First Got Stuck

Sometimes authors use their life experiences and settings for a source of inspiration.  Prior to writing the Shack which was first published in 2007, William P. Young was an office manager and hotel night clerk.  These unusual hours provided an opportunity for William to pour out his heart and soul into writing.  Young’s resolve was rewarded with a book and a 2017 movie with the same name.  One of my favorite lines in this film occurs during a conversation between Sam Worthington and Octavia Spencer.  A troubled father has an encounter with God when the Lord reveals, “Mack this is where you first got stuck.”

When the righteous cry for help, the Lord hears and delivers them out of all their troubles. The Lord is near to the brokenhearted and saves the crushed in spirit. Many are the afflictions of the righteous, but the Lord delivers him out of them all. He keeps all his bones; not one of them is broken, Psalm 34:17-20.

To avoid a spoiler alert, I’ll let everyone who hasn’t seen the Shack to watch for yourself.  In the meantime, this sound byte reveals an important truth about life, at some point everyone get’s stuck.  Like a difficult math equation, it may take an extended period of time to solve this problem.  How you respond to this roadblock will impact your personal growth.  Those who give up, quit or walk away without discovering the answer will leave empty.  Anyone who persists, searches and receives the wisdom to obtain the correct answer will be able to move on, to live and learn.

Casting all your anxieties on him, because he cares for you, 1 Peter 5:7.

In 1988, Christian Icon Michael W. Smith released i 2 Eye.  One of the hit songs from this album is Live and Learn.  The lyrics refers to where human beings first got stuck, tempted by forbidden fruit.  Prior to this day, there was no sin, suffering or pain.  Unfortunately, Adam and Eve’s willful act of disobedience has planted seeds of darkness into human hearts ever since.  Thus, Michael W. Smith writes about the sowing principle, sowing fields of stubbornness in his life.  Depending upon your current life, you may be your own worst enemy, self destructing on your own.  Others may still be stuck from a tragic event from your past, unable to let go of the pain.  Whatever your situation, perhaps its time to find a shack, retreat and spend time with God alone so that you can grow and mature from the place where you first got stuck.

by Jay Mankus

Serve or Be Served… The Latter is More Enticing

When professional athletes struggle to reach their full potential, videos are examined to see what bad habits or flawed fundamentals are present.  Unfortunately, in life most people don’t have film to examine.  Rather, individuals are forced to rely on friends, self reflection or therapists to turn floundering careers around.

Do not be deceived: God is not mocked, for whatever one sows, that will he also reap, Galatians 6:7.

One of the forces at work which determines positive or negative results in the Sowing Principle.  What comes around goes around is an earthly way to describe the biblical expression: you reap what you sow.  Essentially, if you serve others, the Lord will honor this decision by sending unexpected blessings in times of need.  Meanwhile, if the idea of being served by others entices you, the rewards for this choice will be temporary; resulting in a permanent void inside of your heart.

“Give and it will be given to you.  Good measure, pressed down, shaken together, running over, will be put into your lap.  For with the measure you use it will be measured back to you,” Luke 6:38.

Jesus explains this concept to his followers in the verse above.  In the Parable of the Sower found in Matthew 13, Jesus uses the imagery of a harvest to illustrate this principle.  Those who are planted within a fertile soil, environment, production increases.  Thus, if you reach a point in life where you are disciplined, grounded and serving others with your God given gifts, it’s possible to experience bountiful blessings.  Yet, if you feed your sinful nature, pursuing selfish desires, temporary pleasures will quickly vanish leaving a trail of heart break.  The choice is yours.

by Jay Mankus

The Greatest Virtue

As adolescents become adults, its easy to become jaded, scarred by hurtful individuals who tear others down.  In additional, certain personalities do not mesh, resulting in irritation as well as uncomfortable moments.  Throw in those hungry for control or power and you will find hearts hesitant to forgive.

For if you forgive other people when they sin against you, your heavenly Father will also forgive you, Matthew 6:14.

At the conclusion of the Lord’s Prayer, also known as the Our Father, Jesus introduces the reciprocal aspect of forgiveness.  According to the two verses that follow, forgiveness is not received unless it is first extended to others.  Similar to the Sowing Principle, you reap what you sow, forgiveness is conditional based upon the degree in which you forgive and forget the transgressions of others.

But if you do not forgive others their sins, your Father will not forgive your sins, Matthew 6:15.

This perspective of forgiveness makes it one of the greatest virtues.  However, a lack of forgiveness can make it one of the most dangerous, resulting in eternal damnation.  Coping and dealing with personalities that rub you the wrong way can be excruciating, requiring extra grace to those annoying souls you encounter.  Yet, as the apostle Paul states in Colossians 3:12-14, the key to forgiveness is loving others as Christ loved us.  Therefore, ask God for a new heart, willing to forgive, forget and treat others as you want to be treated.

by Jay Mankus